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Tv One Celebrates The Galvanizing Power Of Black Music In New Documentary Special Unsung Presents: Music & The Movement On Monday, January 18, 2021...

TV One has announced the premiere date of its two-part documentary special UNSUNG PRESENTS: MUSIC & THE MOVEMENT –remembering the artists and songs that have provided the soundtrack to the fight for justice and equality – airing part one on Monday, January 18, 2021, at 8 P.M. ET/7C immediately followed by part two at 9 P.M. ET/8C.

Black American Music Association (Bam) And Georgia Entertainment Caucus (Gec) To Host Press Conference

Black American Music Association (BAM) Founders Michael Mauldin and Demmette Guidry, Georgia Entertainment Caucus (GEC) Founders State Representative Erica Thomas and Catherine Brewton, Renowned Artist D.L.

DJ Cassidy Talks Pass The Mic with DARF. TV (Video)

In this episode of DARF. TV (Digital and Radio Facts) the legendary DJ Cassidy talks about the impact of his Pass The Mic series that pretty much broke the internet. We talk about music, the power of the internet, politics, techniques, his illustrious career behind the turntables, and much more.

Esteemed Group of Music Executives to Protect, Preserve and Advocate for Black American Music

An esteemed group of music and entertainment industry leaders, led by Michael Mauldin, Demmette Guidry and Judy Klein, announced the Black American Music As

Urban Radio Could Benefit by Going Back to "Black" Radio

It appears many industry companies are following the advice of Republic records and abandoning the word "Urban" as some form of solidarity with Black Industry people sans our permission or approval of course. I have talked to very few black people who see the benefit UNLESS "urban" is replaced with Black.

Urban Radio Could Benefit by Going Back to “Black” Radio

It appears many industry companies are following the advice of Republic records and abandoning the word "Urban" as some form of solidarity with Black Industry people sans our permission or approval of course. I have talked to very few black people who see the benefit UNLESS "urban" is replaced with Black.

Digital and Radio Facts Removes “URBAN Radio” from the entire site, REPLACES with “BLACK Radio”

So we have no problem with the idea of removing the all-encompassing "Urban" from the industry AND simply REPLACING it with what it is...

Digital and Radio Facts Removes “URBAN” from the entire site, REPLACES with “BLACK”

So we have no problem with the idea of removing the all-encompassing "Urban" from the industry AND simply REPLACING it with what it is...

Radio FactsRemoves “URBAN Radio” from the entire site, REPLACES with “BLACK Radio”

So we have no problem with the idea of removing the all-encompassing "Urban" from the industry AND simply REPLACING it with what it is...

10 Reasons the 70s Black Music is the Absolute BEST Decade

The 70s was a revolutionary period for black people in pride and music. We made undeniable fashion statements and black music addressed the issues of racism and war (Marvin Gaye), black pride (James Brown) and love for ourselves and our community (Earth Wind & Fire). In addition, some of the BEST love songs were made in the 70s that are still played on the air at many radio stations today. Here are 10 reason's why 70s music won't die. Click Next above or below to see the Next Segment

Marvin Gaye

Marvin Gaye personified the decade breaking out in the early 70s with MONSTER hits and closing out the 70s with even more. Rumor is his masterpiece album What's Going On was literally laughed at in a Motown meeting and shelved. Marvin was WAY ahead of his time and he is haunting today's music industry with a vengeance. Interest in him has exploded into a generation that wasn't even born when he died because of Robin Thicke's smash Blurred Lines. The family of Marvin may be suing but watch Marvin's music sales skyrocket.

The Absolute BEST Groups and Singers

There were many legendary groups in the 70s that had such incredible music they can never be duplicated again. The Stylistics, The Chi Lites, Marvin, James Brown who brilliantly combined political issues and self esteem themes to music that filled the dance floors. The Supremes were a whole new group in the 70s who some say were even BETTER after Diana Ross left creating songs that talked about war, love and peace. The Jackson 5 were having hit after hit after hit with the genius Michael Jackson at the helm. Gladys Knight and the Pips were making some of the best written love songs on the planet;, New Birth was an amazing band with amazing singers and many independent labels were able to shine with major hits like The Five Stairsteps, The Temprees, and The Delphonics.

Dance Music

It was the BEST period for various sounds from the dance music of James Brown and Rufus Thomas to Chic and The Ohio Players. Groups were to the extremes when it came to variation but it all blended well. Some may call it "Disco" but many would dare to differ that Chic, Cameo or Cheryl Lynn's Got to be Real were disco records.

The Marriage of Radio, Retail and Record Labels

It was the decade when Radio, Records and Retail worked hand-in-hand together to take a hit all the way to the top with fans. Radio played it and announced what they were playing, record labels worked directly with DJs to play their music and host local concerts bringing some of the biggest groups to town ,Radio created a top 40 list of what they played each week gave it to the records stores and consumers used that list to buy music.

Black Owned Labels

(OK this is a shameless plug this is my sketch of Berry Gordy) Motown Records and Philadelphia International were two black owned labels and they were HUGE. They were dominating the charts and we may never see another monster black owned label again. Many think Stax was black owned but it was not, it was founded by a white brother and sister Jim Stewart and Estelle Axton who combined their last names to come up with Stax.

The Most Hits

There were more black groups in the 70s with more hits than any other period of music

Reaction Still Strong Today

Radio stations are still having great success with formats that play black music from the 70s

Old School Limits

The term "Old School" music is only linked to music from the 70s. 8os and 90s music doesn't work as well as 70s for radio formats.

Musicians Stepped out of the "Black" realm

It was a very BOLD period in music where black musicians tried anything. Barry White had an orchestra which was unheard of. Isaac Hayes has 18 minutes songs on his albums and some of his biggest hits were rehashed and remade. I Stand Accused is a must hear, (originally recorded by Jerry Butler). By the Time I get to Phoenix and Never Can Say Goodbye were all recorded by other artists (Glen Campbell and The Jackson Five). War was huge topic in Black music during the Nixon era and Viet Nam.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lODBVM802H8

Soul Train

Soul Train was a show that every black kid watched to learn the latest dances, see the groups that we would not see on any other show and to hear the best music. The late Don Cornelius had a goldmine with that show and its biggest and best years were in the 70s.

Bruno Mars: Cultural Appropriation or Homage?

We should point to this country's ongoing colorism and bias, which were not created by him but from which he may benefit in terms of crossover acceptanceI really hesitated to post this but: All this talk about Bruno Mars and cultural appropriation has me feeling some kinda way.

ROY AYERS UBIQUITY THROWS OUT A LIFELINEAGAIN JAZZ-FUNK CLASSIC TO BE REISSUED ON VINYL

ROY AYERS UBIQUITY THROWS OUT A LIFELINEAGAIN JAZZ-FUNK CLASSIC TO BE REISSUED ON VINYL ON AUGUST 18 IN HONOR OF ALBUM’S 40TH ANNIVERSARY Lifeline, Roy Ayers Ubiquity’s inimitable, influential 1977 fusion of jazz, pop, funk, and disco, will be reissued on vinyl on August 18 via Polydor/UMe in honor of the album’s 40thanniversary.

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