Woman from Wild Wings Contacts Radio Facts , States Black Patrons Asked to Leave...

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radio facts,radio djs,urban adult,Urban Radio,
urban radio personalities, rap radio stations,r&b radio station, hip hop music radio, black female singersThis story was orginally posted on August 26, 2013. The irony is that the company has had repeated claims of racial discrimination since. They are involed in one as you read this.A woman contacted Radio Facts who works at the Wild Wings restaurant that asked the black patrons to leave. and asked that we allow her to be anonymous. She states there are several reasons the group was asked to leave (below)  Radiofacts.comYou’re only getting one side of story here. I work at the restaurant and your representation of the events is way off base. The group was being loud and obnoxious to both customers and staffers. They kept complaining about their long wait and were talking about how “whitey” was able to get seated, but they were not. The problem was that they had a large group and insisted on sitting next to each other. We only had one area that could accommodate their large group and the patrons in that area were not done. So yes, some “whities” were able to be seated before them, but only because they were going to a different area. We also seated non-whites in other areas too…They made this a racial issue before anything. One of the guests also insulted a deaf white girl because she didn’t respond to one of them telling her to move (she was deaf and didn’t hear them) They were also all standing in the middle of the walk way, making it difficult for customers to leave. We asked them if they could move over, but they said they can stand wherever they want, and if we wanted them out of the way then we should seat them. The customer that was offended was offended by a particular individual’s constant uses of the word “n*gger” When asked to stop, he threw out a long string of racial epithets against one of my co-workers. See the original story here

Woman from Wild Wings Contacts Radio Facts , States Black Patrons Asked to Leave...

0
radio facts,radio djs,urban adult,Urban Radio,
urban radio personalities, rap radio stations,r&b radio station, hip hop music radio, black female singersThis story was orginally posted on August 26, 2013. The irony is that the company has had repeated claims of racial discrimination since. They are involed in one as you read this.A woman contacted Radio Facts who works at the Wild Wings restaurant that asked the black patrons to leave. and asked that we allow her to be anonymous. She states there are several reasons the group was asked to leave (below)  Radiofacts.comYou’re only getting one side of story here. I work at the restaurant and your representation of the events is way off base. The group was being loud and obnoxious to both customers and staffers. They kept complaining about their long wait and were talking about how “whitey” was able to get seated, but they were not. The problem was that they had a large group and insisted on sitting next to each other. We only had one area that could accommodate their large group and the patrons in that area were not done. So yes, some “whities” were able to be seated before them, but only because they were going to a different area. We also seated non-whites in other areas too…They made this a racial issue before anything. One of the guests also insulted a deaf white girl because she didn’t respond to one of them telling her to move (she was deaf and didn’t hear them) They were also all standing in the middle of the walk way, making it difficult for customers to leave. We asked them if they could move over, but they said they can stand wherever they want, and if we wanted them out of the way then we should seat them. The customer that was offended was offended by a particular individual’s constant uses of the word “n*gger” When asked to stop, he threw out a long string of racial epithets against one of my co-workers. See the original story here

D.L. Hughley Says America Has a Real Problem and It’s Not Colin Kaepernick

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Radio Facts:  D.L. Hughley does it again! It's getting to the point that every time something controversial happens in America, I'm looking to D.L. Hughley and a few others opinions on the matter.Of course, I have my own opinion on the matters involving Colin Kaepernick but DL gives his opinion in such an unapologetic fashion and it is quite refreshing. Listen to what DL has to say about this new ...

Kyle Santillian’s Ready to TAKEOVER the Radio Industry

radio facts,radio djs,urban adult,Urban Radio,
urban radio personalities, rap radio stations,r&b radio station, hip hop music radio, black female singers  Many urban radio people, including PDs (still), feel it's better to maintain a low profile to maintain a more neutral stance with their respective corporations.[/penci_blockquote]This story originally ran June 11, 2017Several years ago I was getting constant videos and segments from a radio show at WJMH. Kyle Santillian was on a hustle to do greater things. I ran the segments because it was almost unheard of for black Radio DJs to promote themselves and as an industry news trade it made my job very difficult but I understood the resistance. Many urban radio people, including PDs (still), feel it's better to maintain a low profile to maintain a more neutral stance with their respective corporations. I also understand the corporation's need to protect its branding. Nevertheless, Santillian found a way to slip through the cracks and do what he needed to do. The industry took note including industry vet Derrick Brown who took a chance by bringing the vet to a major market to do the morning show after a previous morning show at GCI failed. Before that WGCI had been running syndicated shows. Kyle Santillian was born in Philadelphia and raised in Franklinville, New Jersey, a small rural town about 30 minutes from downtown Philly.  He started his radio career in 1999 as an intern at WJMH (102 Jamz) in Greensboro, NC. while he was a Junior at Winston-Salem State University. He was then promoted from intern to promotions assistant. Promotions assistant to part-time on air. Part-time on-air to full-time nights in 2001.  He hosted nights for two years. Then he hosted Mornings from 2003 to 2014….amazingly all at the same station. After that, his 15 year run at Jamz, ended and he was unemployed for about six months then he landed at WGCI doing mornings in Chicago.RADIO FACTS: I remember before the WGCI gig your online hustle was hard. You were obviously determined. How did you motivate yourself? KYLE SANTILLIAN: I was just motivated by not wanting to be a failure.  Not wanting to be a person who lost their job and was never working in radio again.  I was using the only outlet I had at the time, the internet.   Did/Do you have any mentors? Absolutely!  I would say my first mentor was Kendall B most recently of KS 107.5 in Denver.  He was working Nights when I was interning at Jamz. He was the 1st person to allow me to touch the board and even run his board for a portion of his show. From there, I’ll just list some names of some people that have given me great advice and have been an inspiration to me at different times in my career.
  • D’ Cherie of WNAA 90.1 Greensboro (Rest in Peace)
  • Brian Douglas of WJMH Greensboro
  • Uzi D of WPEG in Charlotte
  • Sammy Mack aka Buckwilde formerly of 95.7 Jamz in Birmingham
  • BJ Murphy of Charlotte
What has been the greatest asset to your career? I personally believe that it’s the ability to be a “real person.”  I was trained from day one to be a personality…be who you are on air, rather than just a “liner Radio DJ.”  Let your personality show & don’t overemphasize your words. What has been the greatest challenge? Sometimes the challenge is maintaining the balance between work and family.  I try to do my best to handle both accordingly. Sometimes there are conflicting things on my calendar but overall, I think I’ve done pretty well with it. It’s not easy though. Many radio people say that syndication sucks but if they are offered the chance to do it, they will jump at it. Is that fair? It’s a catch 22. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t dream of one day having that national audience as well.   What's a typical day like in your working world? A typical day starts at 4 am.  On air from 6-10 am.  Depending on the day, after work is either meetings, recording promos or commercial/sponsor reads.  Hopefully get home with enough time to catch a power nap, before the kids get out of school.  Juggle their after school activities and helping with homework, dinner, family time. Then spend a couple of hours on prep for the next day, searching the internet for tomorrow’s news, topics or soundbites.  After all that, some nights there are evening events to attend and sometimes I can just shut it down, but it just depends on the day. Are there any industry people that you greatly admire? Absolutely.  I grew up listening to Power 99 in Philly, So I have great memories of Cater & Sandborn in the Morning.  I always admired them. (Rest in Peace to Brian Carter.)  Also, Lady B was influential to our whole generation of Hip Hop! Then, of course, Colby Colb’s “Radioactive” show.  As far as those who are currently on-air, I’ve always loved Big Boy’s show in LA.  I have a lot of respect for Charlamagne and The Breakfast Club Radio Show. I also used to listen to Angela Yee on XM before they all formed the Breakfast Club.  Because I started radio in NC, I admire all of the people before me who began or spent their early days there and went on to achieve great things. People like Skip Dillard (WBLS and WLIB), Derreck Corbett, Bushman, Mad Hatta, Tre Black (RIP), Afrika Perry, Angelique Perrin, and many more!Where do you see the industry going in the next couple of years? I see the industry continuing to evolve and further utilizing Digital. The radio industry is already utilizing all the available digital platforms as a way to extend our brands and I expect that to continue. How do you feel about technology?  I have a love/hate relationship with it.  I’ve always had a love for electronics, technology, recording equipment, computers and things like that.  It's dope to have the world at your fingertips BUT always being on your phone can make you MISS what’s actually in front of your face. Social media is consuming people. We have to find a way to balance and use it productively without it dominating our lives. How important is social media to do your show? When it comes to our show, it’s very important.  It helps people get a glimpse into who we are.  It lets them know what’s coming up.  It allows people to follow up on what they may have already heard on-air.  I find that most importantly, it allows people to connect with us.  When you meet people in the street that follow you on social media, they talk to you like you’ve been best friends for years. Lol.  I love that about it.What's the greatest mistake that you find many radio people constantly make?  Trying to be too cool.  Just be you.  Be fun. Be vulnerable. Be emotional (at times.) Just be a real person. What do you think makes a Charlamagne vs a local radio Radio DJ who is stuck in a market for years? Exactly what I previously stated.  He has always been unapologetically Charlamagne.  He is who he is.  Also, people don’t network like they use too.  You may work in one market, but who do you know in other markets?  Who can you reach out to another city if you had to?  For YEARS I was in Greensboro trapped in a bubble so to speak.  Then maybe 2-3 years before my run ended there, I made every effort possible to go and meet people outside of my market.  I think that helped me when I found myself looking for a new job.  I also think that, even when you’re trying your best to be local, you have to work on having a sound that can also resonate in other markets. What would you be doing if you were not in radio? I used to make a MEAN hoagie back in the day when I worked at Wawa! Lol.  But honestly, I don’t know.  Other than Hip Hop itself, radio is the only thing that kept my attention long term. Being in the 3rd largest radio market how do you stay grounded from the "industry life?" (separating personal and professional) Two things.  #1 is my family.  All that “celebrity stuff” means absolutely NOTHING inside the walls of my home.  My wife and I are trying to raise responsible kids who will achieve their own greatness and also have an understanding of the struggles of our people, past and present. The second thing is, I was an adult before I ever got into radio.  I remember what real life can be like, and will never let me allow an “industry” life to get me jaded.  I do enjoy being in the industry and participating in industry events but at the same time, I kinda vowed to never fall into that “industry” mindset.  What's the best way to develop lasting relationships in the industry?  In my opinion, being genuine, humble and listening more than talking. Do you think it's possible to have true friends in a lifestyle industry? Yes.  And if not, just have a friend who’s NOT in the industry. Personally, I had enough family and friends before I got into this, so I’m good.  I’m the oldest of damn near 30 1st cousins…they’re my friends. Lol. What are some of the things that you are working on to build your branding?  Being consistent with my on-air features, appearances in the community and have a presence in the Chicago social/entertainment scene are my priorities.   How do you educate yourself about the future of the industry? Mostly through conversations with people like yourself and various friends and PDs around the country. Any advice for a young Radio DJ interesting in radio? Dedicate yourself to being the same person on-air that you are in real life.  Utilize the platforms that you have to develop your skills.  Create your own content. Develop your own audience.  Listen to those who’ve done it before you.  Don’t expect the station to put you in a position to do anything.  Be a self-starter!Do you come across young people who are interested in radio or has that dwindled over the years? Of course!  I JUST got a call from someone who wants to do radio and is looking for advice.  Also, I’ve recently spoken to a classroom full of media students.  The interest is strong. Where do you see yourself in 3 years? Gainfully Employed. Lol. Anything else? Yeah man, I’m happy to be in Chicago!  The city has been good to me since day one.  Shout out to Derrick Brown for returning my email and bringing me on board here at WGCI! Lol.  Seriously though, I’m just grateful to still be doing this every day.  Has it always been easy? No.  But I do believe that it’s always been worth it!   

Kyle Santillian’s Ready to TAKEOVER the Radio Industry

radio facts,radio djs,urban adult,Urban Radio,
urban radio personalities, rap radio stations,r&b radio station, hip hop music radio, black female singers  Many urban radio people, including PDs (still), feel it's better to maintain a low profile to maintain a more neutral stance with their respective corporations.[/penci_blockquote]This story originally ran June 11, 2017Several years ago I was getting constant videos and segments from a radio show at WJMH. Kyle Santillian was on a hustle to do greater things. I ran the segments because it was almost unheard of for black Radio DJs to promote themselves and as an industry news trade it made my job very difficult but I understood the resistance. Many urban radio people, including PDs (still), feel it's better to maintain a low profile to maintain a more neutral stance with their respective corporations. I also understand the corporation's need to protect its branding. Nevertheless, Santillian found a way to slip through the cracks and do what he needed to do. The industry took note including industry vet Derrick Brown who took a chance by bringing the vet to a major market to do the morning show after a previous morning show at GCI failed. Before that WGCI had been running syndicated shows. Kyle Santillian was born in Philadelphia and raised in Franklinville, New Jersey, a small rural town about 30 minutes from downtown Philly.  He started his radio career in 1999 as an intern at WJMH (102 Jamz) in Greensboro, NC. while he was a Junior at Winston-Salem State University. He was then promoted from intern to promotions assistant. Promotions assistant to part-time on air. Part-time on-air to full-time nights in 2001.  He hosted nights for two years. Then he hosted Mornings from 2003 to 2014….amazingly all at the same station. After that, his 15 year run at Jamz, ended and he was unemployed for about six months then he landed at WGCI doing mornings in Chicago.RADIO FACTS: I remember before the WGCI gig your online hustle was hard. You were obviously determined. How did you motivate yourself? KYLE SANTILLIAN: I was just motivated by not wanting to be a failure.  Not wanting to be a person who lost their job and was never working in radio again.  I was using the only outlet I had at the time, the internet.   Did/Do you have any mentors? Absolutely!  I would say my first mentor was Kendall B most recently of KS 107.5 in Denver.  He was working Nights when I was interning at Jamz. He was the 1st person to allow me to touch the board and even run his board for a portion of his show. From there, I’ll just list some names of some people that have given me great advice and have been an inspiration to me at different times in my career.
  • D’ Cherie of WNAA 90.1 Greensboro (Rest in Peace)
  • Brian Douglas of WJMH Greensboro
  • Uzi D of WPEG in Charlotte
  • Sammy Mack aka Buckwilde formerly of 95.7 Jamz in Birmingham
  • BJ Murphy of Charlotte
What has been the greatest asset to your career? I personally believe that it’s the ability to be a “real person.”  I was trained from day one to be a personality…be who you are on air, rather than just a “liner Radio DJ.”  Let your personality show & don’t overemphasize your words. What has been the greatest challenge? Sometimes the challenge is maintaining the balance between work and family.  I try to do my best to handle both accordingly. Sometimes there are conflicting things on my calendar but overall, I think I’ve done pretty well with it. It’s not easy though. Many radio people say that syndication sucks but if they are offered the chance to do it, they will jump at it. Is that fair? It’s a catch 22. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t dream of one day having that national audience as well.   What's a typical day like in your working world? A typical day starts at 4 am.  On air from 6-10 am.  Depending on the day, after work is either meetings, recording promos or commercial/sponsor reads.  Hopefully get home with enough time to catch a power nap, before the kids get out of school.  Juggle their after school activities and helping with homework, dinner, family time. Then spend a couple of hours on prep for the next day, searching the internet for tomorrow’s news, topics or soundbites.  After all that, some nights there are evening events to attend and sometimes I can just shut it down, but it just depends on the day. Are there any industry people that you greatly admire? Absolutely.  I grew up listening to Power 99 in Philly, So I have great memories of Cater & Sandborn in the Morning.  I always admired them. (Rest in Peace to Brian Carter.)  Also, Lady B was influential to our whole generation of Hip Hop! Then, of course, Colby Colb’s “Radioactive” show.  As far as those who are currently on-air, I’ve always loved Big Boy’s show in LA.  I have a lot of respect for Charlamagne and The Breakfast Club Radio Show. I also used to listen to Angela Yee on XM before they all formed the Breakfast Club.  Because I started radio in NC, I admire all of the people before me who began or spent their early days there and went on to achieve great things. People like Skip Dillard (WBLS and WLIB), Derreck Corbett, Bushman, Mad Hatta, Tre Black (RIP), Afrika Perry, Angelique Perrin, and many more!Where do you see the industry going in the next couple of years? I see the industry continuing to evolve and further utilizing Digital. The radio industry is already utilizing all the available digital platforms as a way to extend our brands and I expect that to continue. How do you feel about technology?  I have a love/hate relationship with it.  I’ve always had a love for electronics, technology, recording equipment, computers and things like that.  It's dope to have the world at your fingertips BUT always being on your phone can make you MISS what’s actually in front of your face. Social media is consuming people. We have to find a way to balance and use it productively without it dominating our lives. How important is social media to do your show? When it comes to our show, it’s very important.  It helps people get a glimpse into who we are.  It lets them know what’s coming up.  It allows people to follow up on what they may have already heard on-air.  I find that most importantly, it allows people to connect with us.  When you meet people in the street that follow you on social media, they talk to you like you’ve been best friends for years. Lol.  I love that about it.What's the greatest mistake that you find many radio people constantly make?  Trying to be too cool.  Just be you.  Be fun. Be vulnerable. Be emotional (at times.) Just be a real person. What do you think makes a Charlamagne vs a local radio Radio DJ who is stuck in a market for years? Exactly what I previously stated.  He has always been unapologetically Charlamagne.  He is who he is.  Also, people don’t network like they use too.  You may work in one market, but who do you know in other markets?  Who can you reach out to another city if you had to?  For YEARS I was in Greensboro trapped in a bubble so to speak.  Then maybe 2-3 years before my run ended there, I made every effort possible to go and meet people outside of my market.  I think that helped me when I found myself looking for a new job.  I also think that, even when you’re trying your best to be local, you have to work on having a sound that can also resonate in other markets. What would you be doing if you were not in radio? I used to make a MEAN hoagie back in the day when I worked at Wawa! Lol.  But honestly, I don’t know.  Other than Hip Hop itself, radio is the only thing that kept my attention long term. Being in the 3rd largest radio market how do you stay grounded from the "industry life?" (separating personal and professional) Two things.  #1 is my family.  All that “celebrity stuff” means absolutely NOTHING inside the walls of my home.  My wife and I are trying to raise responsible kids who will achieve their own greatness and also have an understanding of the struggles of our people, past and present. The second thing is, I was an adult before I ever got into radio.  I remember what real life can be like, and will never let me allow an “industry” life to get me jaded.  I do enjoy being in the industry and participating in industry events but at the same time, I kinda vowed to never fall into that “industry” mindset.  What's the best way to develop lasting relationships in the industry?  In my opinion, being genuine, humble and listening more than talking. Do you think it's possible to have true friends in a lifestyle industry? Yes.  And if not, just have a friend who’s NOT in the industry. Personally, I had enough family and friends before I got into this, so I’m good.  I’m the oldest of damn near 30 1st cousins…they’re my friends. Lol. What are some of the things that you are working on to build your branding?  Being consistent with my on-air features, appearances in the community and have a presence in the Chicago social/entertainment scene are my priorities.   How do you educate yourself about the future of the industry? Mostly through conversations with people like yourself and various friends and PDs around the country. Any advice for a young Radio DJ interesting in radio? Dedicate yourself to being the same person on-air that you are in real life.  Utilize the platforms that you have to develop your skills.  Create your own content. Develop your own audience.  Listen to those who’ve done it before you.  Don’t expect the station to put you in a position to do anything.  Be a self-starter!Do you come across young people who are interested in radio or has that dwindled over the years? Of course!  I JUST got a call from someone who wants to do radio and is looking for advice.  Also, I’ve recently spoken to a classroom full of media students.  The interest is strong. Where do you see yourself in 3 years? Gainfully Employed. Lol. Anything else? Yeah man, I’m happy to be in Chicago!  The city has been good to me since day one.  Shout out to Derrick Brown for returning my email and bringing me on board here at WGCI! Lol.  Seriously though, I’m just grateful to still be doing this every day.  Has it always been easy? No.  But I do believe that it’s always been worth it!   

Vintage Black Radio DJs

WOW, NOBODY guessed who these people are. We don't know our Black radio history anymore... too bad. Well here it is, this is who they are...Martha Jean the QueenMartha Jean "The Queen" Steinberg (September 9, 1930  - January 29, 2000) was an influential African-American radio broadcaster and later was also the pastor of her own church.She was born Martha Jean Jones in Memphis, Tennessee. Her first radio job was on ...

On Benjamin Crump’s Speaking Skills

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[caption id="attachment_242779" align="alignnone" width="1024"]radio facts,radio djs,urban adult,Urban Radio,
urban radio personalities, rap radio stations,r&b radio station, hip hop music radio, black female singers (Photo by Leon Bennett/Getty Images)[/caption]

...when you are in representing somebody in a courtroom, where life and death could hang in the balance, should you not go the extra mile on your presentation?

This is constructive in every meaning and intention of the word. It is not an attack on Benjamin Crump. Ben has done a great job of representing the community and his intentions for all intents and purposes are good.

This is about all the college professors, high school teachers and others who "lead" others. Communication skills are still the key to success and they don't have to be excellent but they should reflect your target audience. With all the BS electives that we take in college, why to make drama or speech and communication a requirement? A couple of decades ago, Magic Johnson had the same issue and he took care of the problem by consulting with a speech therapist.

While I am aware of what goes on in court and who plays an integral part in a case like the prosecution, defense, judge, witnesses, jury, evidence etc I am not a legal expert but I am a communications professional. How often do we consider the communication skills of an attorney and how that plays a part in presenting a case and/or reaching the jury? The loss of a black boy or a black man's life be it from a white cop or anyone else is tragic.  Condolences to Mike Brown and Trayvon Martin's family for their losses but I want to dig deeper and talk to radio pros about something I noticed during the Mike Brown Grand Jury decision as well as Trayvon's trial.

It's very difficult to be a professional radio announcer and publish a site targeting other radio pros and not be aware of Attorney Benjamin Crump's communication skills. Crump was one of the attorneys for both Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown's families. Crump reminds me of Christopher Darden, (pictured) remember him during the loss in the OJ Simpson trial? This is not to discredit Crump's experience and expertise, from all appearances, he is extremely well versed in law and has abundant knowledge.

Urban Radio Pros Know this...

As radio pros we KNOW that our job is to move, inspire, encourage, entertain and educate our audiences.  I'm not saying anyone has to speak in a way that is foreign to them but when you are in representing somebody in or out of a courtroom situation, where life and death could hang in the balance, should you not go the extra mile on your presentation? It has always been my thinking that attorneys and professors should take acting and speech classes in college as part of their training since there are SO many electives that we will never use in life, why not make this a required course?

When I heard Benjamin Crump speak during the CNN coverage of the looting after he and the prosecutor did not return with an inducement, I was shocked at what I heard. This is not the first time I have heard him speak but I realized I immediately tuned him out when I heard him before because I had to work too hard to interpret and understand what he was saying and his poor energy in addition did not leave me the option to do that. Is this what the prosecution and as a result, the jury did too (Trayvon Martin trial)?

It's not just the pronunciation of words, it's the inflection, modulation and overall delivery that gets the message across and you don't have to be the BEST speaker to do it but where you lack in one area it certainly helps to gain strength in another. When you are flat in all areas there is a problem. The quality of any leader lies in his ability to communicate.

Communication skills are PARAMOUNT to get you from point A to point B and it is also an integral part of one being taken seriously. I'm not talking about your use of the English language as much as I'm talking about the combination of the use and/or your ability to persuade, convince, sell, motivate and encourage. I would think those are the qualities any good attorney needs to succeed. At least the ones that I know have those qualities. When you look at hip hop music it's the same thing, the best rappers don't rap like white people talk but they are able to convince, sell, encourage, motivate, etc. I have seen very angry people yelling and screaming or suffering from a loss in a foreign language but their pain and frustration is still recognizable and transcribed.

If you were watching American Idol and a great singer came out and was singing with her head down and arms glued to her side, she had no motivation, never made eye contact and didn't use her space, how apt would you be to listen to her and believe her? Moreover, vote for her? Was she able to convince you with such limited effort? Being a great singer is just the start.

Benjamin's communication skills may or may not be the catalyst that lost both the Trayvon Martin case AND the attempt to garner an indictment for Darren Wilson but he was the family attorney and the face of both cases  and he will go down in history as the attorney who lost not one but two historic cases even though he did not technically lose the cases he was the attorney who represented the families.  Mike Brown's parents probably hired Crump's team to represent them after his involvement in losing the landmark Trayvon Martin case... Pro Bono, perhaps, it was the best they could do. I cannot blame them for that but did they have any other options? It was a very high-profile case. It would seem there would have been other attorneys wanting to be on board.  How apt would you have been to hire an attorney to represent you who was involved in a similar case that lost?

Great Communication Sells Ideas, Thoughts and Goals and Influences Others

Without question St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Bob McCulloch, may not be likable but he does have great communication skills. During the press conference, he was very believable for most of his speech, even if you didn't like him... you listened to him. Even though it was long and drawn out you heard every word he said and it didn't bother you as much that he was taking too long to state whether or not Darren Wilson would be indicted.  (By the way, these are the types of jobs, spokespersons, that older radio Radio DJs would be great for if they only apply). He did not do as well during the question and answer period which began to discredit his previous believable segment and that's probably when a lot of black people lost interest. He became defensive, he lost his "cool" effect and he came off like he was an elitist and insulted by a couple of the reporter's questions. If you look at the video you can sense the anger in the minority reporters who asked questions as well, they maintained themselves but once again, they were able to communicate their feelings through their body language and their questions.

When you see great attorneys in the courtroom they are often very animated and they always have excellent communication skills, they know how to make the jury think and witnesses break down, it's not just about asking the right questions it's about the WAY the questions are asked and how they are answered. Who can remember Johnny Cochran during the OJ trial? He was educated, informed, animated, unpredictable, interesting creative, dramatic and convincing. Overall, he had great communication skills. A politician is not going to get the vote if he is not able to communicate with voters and a professor is going to have a lot of sleepy students and failing grades to give out if he or she does not know how to communicate.

When you look at Maxine Waters (pictured) and you are from the black community you are immediately able to relate to her persona. Who didn't have a mother, aunt, teacher or neighbor or woman at the church that Maxine reminds them of? She has your attention right away and she keeps it.

Not Always Used for Good

Great communicators get your attention and can sway you in their direction even when they are wrong. Some of the worst leaders in the world were able to get people to follow them because of their communication skills. Con artists are able to rip people off because of their great communication skills. They make you think they are the vulnerable ones and that they can be taken advantage of and people fall for it and lose. The ability may not always be used for good but it has to be used if you are trying to convince someone. You have to be able to enlighten, educate, inform, reach and touch your audience.

If the odds are already stacked against us when it comes to the legal system, would it not behoove us to at least be completely prepared? You can tighten up your communication skills, it's not something that cannot be worked on and changed for the better.

I want to clarify that Benjamin Crump can do whatever he wants to do. If he feels that he is effective the way that he is than that's his choice and option to do so.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBqJRXHIQV4

Vintage Black Radio DJs

WOW, NOBODY guessed who these people are. We don't know our urban radio history anymore... too bad. Well here it is, this is who they are...Martha Jean the QueenMartha Jean "The Queen" Steinberg (September 9, 1930  - January 29, 2000) was an influential African-American radio broadcaster and later was also the pastor of her own church.She was born Martha Jean Jones in Memphis, Tennessee. Her first radio job was on ...

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